Fifth Air Force Fifth Air Force Service Command Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 322 Unit 1 27 June, 1944
Subject: Unit History, Month of June To : Commanding General, Army Air Forces. (Thru channels) The period between June first and June fifteenth, which this report Covers, was a rather unsettled one for the company. We find ourselves, a unit assigned to the operation of boats, situated away from our natural element, the water, and residing in an area, which although very wet, is not very handy to the loading docks. The temporary Maintenance Shop, in the 308th roa, is not installed, the machines set up, and maintenance to our small boats has been under way. After a twelve day wait, the F-16 was taken on to the dry dock and given a thorough bottom job, consisting of scraping and panting, checking the shaft, screw pitch, and stern bearing and gland. It was recommended that a new bearing be installed and Milne Bay was contacted for availability of a new bearing or a block of Kasi-Kasi hardwood from which to turn a new one. A block of this wood finally arrived but was found to be too small a piece for the size of the shaft. The old bearing was turned and put back onto place. We hope it lasts. To complicate matters, the FA-1 crept into port with her reduction gear, which was practically new, breaking up into pieces and the grindings being drawn into the oil line scoring the oil housing. Since an American built, "Joes" Reduction gear is not available we will have to install another Australian gear which we know will stand up no longer than the last. On June tenth this organization was re-designated as the "14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron" and Lt. McDonald was dispatched to ADVON to receive instruction as to the functions of the unit under the new set-up. Captain Marshall C. Brown Jr., took command of the Squadron on June thirteenth. Captain Brown was formerly Commanding Officer of the 2039th QM Truck Company at APO 713. To date the FA-2 is still down at APO 923 for repairs. Fortunately a set of helical reduction gears was on hand there for installation and this fact should prove to be a very happy event in the months of operation yet to come. The Australian spur gears cannot compare with the American helicals.
Donald W. McDonald 1st Lt., Q.M.C. Historical Officer.



Fifth Air Force Fifth Air Force Service Command Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 322 Unit 1 5 August, 1944
Subject: Unit History, Month of July To : Commanding General, Army Air Forces. (Thru channels) Six weeks ago this Organization was redesignated from the 1001st Quartermaster Boat Company (Avn) to the 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron and in that period things have happened that are strange and interesting to all of us. When a unit suddenly finds itself increased in strength by one hundred percent it is something to talk about. However, talking alone has not been our occupation as with these new things before us there is alone also the physical to consider, namely work. For over a year we have operated our ninety-nine foot cargo ships from Australia to points far to the north. Our work was interesting and it kept us busy. There was always the problems of supply and maintenance staring us in the face. With these there was little time for "mattress- backing". Our days were full. Now all this becomes only half of our job as withing the last few weeks high speed rescue boats and their crews have arrived in New Guinea and are assigned to us wholely and completely. Where once this organization was sitting on the New Guinea beaches without a boat to its name, and with little knowledge where those necessary items were to materialize from, we find ourselves like the old women who lived in a shoe, except that our super-abundances are boats. We seem to have boats, little ones and big ones, all over the Southwest Pacific. We shudder to think what would happen if they all came steaming into Dreger Harbor at one time. As large as their number is we hear that this is only the beginning. Our "F" boats, like very small infants, must have their bottoms looked after periodically. We now have the F-5, and the F-6 on the drydock at Milne Bay for that very purpose and the F-16 has just completed like attentions. Unfortunately we suffered the usual lack of spare parts and all her troubles could not be rectified. We are keeping our fingers crossed for her until these spares arrive. The FA-1 is now back in operation after a layup for replacement of new reduction gears. We think we have the problem licked now as we were able to secure a set of helical gears from the states. With the installation of a duplicate set of these American gears in the FA-2, we now have not a single one of our boats operating with the crude, and soft, spur gears. For this we give thanks. Arriving on the FA-2 were two items that we have long awaited in our Maintenance section. They are a power lathe with a seven foot bed, and a seventy-five ton hydraulic press. How many times could we have used this last. We now have the largest capacity press in this entire area. If the barge on which we plan to install our Maintenance Shop were to arrive here now, it would eliminate our final big problem. We regret deeply to have to close this report with the sad news that one of our new Warrant Officer lost his life in an unfortunate mishap aboard a rescue boat at Milne Bay. Under undermined circumstances this boat caught fire and when the fierce blaze was extinguished, Mr. Swayer was missing. He was in his first month in New Guinea.
Donald W. McDonald 1st Lt., Q.M.C. Historical Officer.



Fifth Air Force Fifth Air Force Service Command 1055th Q.M. Co., SG (Avn) (Det) Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 322 Unit 1 6 September 1944
Subject: Unit History, Month of August To : Commanding General, Army Air Forces. (Thru channels) During the month August, this organization saw its first four Rescue Boats leave for the forward areas. The boats were conditioned from stem to stern which included complete radio installations. Paul Theriot, a civilian representative of Hall-Scott Marine Engines, arrived here on the 15 August 1944 to help straighten out the "Kinks" in several of the engines. During this month five more boat crews were disbanded and absorbed into this Squadron, namely, the 49th, 126th, 127th, 128th, & 129th Emergency Rescue Boat Crews, and have departed for APO 928 to put in commission there the 85' boats. Lt. Donald W. McDonald departed for APO 920 on TD to pick a suitable camp site for this organization. Sergeant Leonard A. Nelson finally started on the first leg of his home- ward bound journey after spending 30 months overseas. After fifteen months in grade as Second Lieutenants, John T. Scanlan and John B. White are now wearing Silver Bars. 2nd Lt. William N. Mathias joined this organization from 1838 Ordnance S & M Co. where he was Ammunition Officer and was assigned the duties of Squadron Adjutant, Personnel Officer, Public Relations Officer, Intelligence Officer, Chemical Warfare Officer, Unit Censor and Historical Officer. The F-5 & 6 are still undergoing repairs and will be back in operation by the second week in September.
Donald W. McDonald 1st Lt., Q.M.C. Historical Officer.



Fifth Air Force Fifth Air Force Service Command 1055th Q.M. Co., SG (Avn) (Det) Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 322 Unit 1
Subject: Unit History, Month of September 1944 To : Commanding General, Army Air Forces. (Thru channels) The close of this month saw three 28' sea sled, five 63' and two 85' Rescues Boats in operation and working out of Biak. Two more of those slick 85's will be headed in that direction just after the first of the month, leaving just one 45 footer to be fitted out and towed north. The range of the latter is so short as to prohibit an attempt to run under their own power. Yes, it sounds as though we might be ready to close up shop and catch up on some lost "sac time", but those ten 85' on the way from Sydney guarantee another enjoyable session of fitting and repairing. When they are completed everyone will be looking for the shore detachment to be moved a good long ways. The rescue boats were called out on futile missions four different times. Once we were called out in the direction of New Britain, 24 hrs of rough water, no food, no sleep, a useless mission will fray the best of tempers and our men are no exceptions. One really successful and worthwhile mission will change the entire picture. A.T.S. men were relieved from duty aboard the H-10 at close of the month and crew from this squadron substituted. WOJG William C. Baker, one of the best skippers in the outfit, was given command and seems very well pleased with new child, a bouncing baby of 150 feet. Most of the crew have considerable salt in their veins and are very happy to be back at sea aboard such a fine ship (compared to the other freight boats) and the prospects of a trip to Guadalcanal and possibility of a few drinks of American liquor. Several small tugs and "J" boats were received from Milne and Oro Bays. They should prove very useful in maintaining communication between our sprawling activities, shifting positions, and work of that type. Lt. Becher and his very capable supply section were continually combing "irate" skippers out of their collective hair (singular) last month. Some of the "hot shots" fresh from the states still can't realize they are not at home or why they are not able to draw an object five minutes after the requisition has been submitted. The whole supply problem in this theater was very carefully explained to one certain skipper and the reasons why certain items are just not available; after forty-five minutes he came out with this brilliant observation, "I don't see why we can't get it here, they told us before we left the states we would be able to get everything we needed just as soon as we reached New Guinea, and I don't see why we can't". I don't think the condition is serious or lasting, they will "wise up" after 8-10 months overseas. We hope. It was obvious to everyone that Lt. Sanders was loaded with everything his crew could possibly handle, but it was not until he submitted this list of completed installations that we realized the real size of his project: In nine boats they installed 18 ea SCR 287 Liaison Sets; 9 ea Radio Compass, SCR 269G, 9 ea Radio Sets, SCR-522 (VHF), 9 ea Command sets, SCR-274N, 9 ea Radio Sets, SCR-695 (IFF), 9 ea Radio Sets SCR-578 (Emergency 500 KC Transmitter), 5 ea Power Plan, C-10, 1 ea Power Plant PE-143. If the reader knows as much about radio as the writer he will probably look blank and say quietly "Well, Well." 1st Sgt. Robert Copher and Sgt. Charles Cusano drag down additional honors for their very efficient handling of all administrative matters. Inspectors from higher headquarters gave them a perfect score on all their records and paper procedure. Our strength on the first of the month was 84 officer and 265 Enlisted Men; we closed with 88 officer and 320 Enlisted Men. Considerable gain bringing us to T/O strength, we could still use several more good men. Generally speaking the morale is good but there are several factors tending to lower it. An enlisted Mess man on the F boats will draw from $60-$75, while an ATS Mess man on another ship of the same type will collect from $350-$400 every month. There is no possible way to justify such a discrepancy but the men are to be complimented on regarding it as philosophically as they do.
William N. Mathias 2nd Lt., Air Corps, Historical Officer.



Fifth Air Force V Air Force Service Command 5276 Composite Group 1 October - 31 October 1944. Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 72
Unit History, Month of October, 1944
The Commanding Officer, Captain Marshall C. Brown Jr. was on TD at APO 920 from the 3 October until 15 October, obtaining clarification on the move proposed for this organization. The two 85' Rescue boats still at Dreger Harbor on the first of the month finally started for Biak. Luck seemed to be against them for one was forced into Hollandia and the other into Wakde for wheel repairs. Four of the 45' Rescue boats remain at Dregar Harbor undergoing various types of repairs. The big news for the month was the move to the Philippines by the headquarters section of this organization, consisting of 6 Officers, 3 Warrant Officers and 25 Enlisted Men. It was perhaps as quick a move as the Army has ever made, the Coast Guard vessel FP 142 was assigned to this organization to be used for transportation to these islands and as a Tender in the future; by 0830 hours October 17 we had completed the loading and were headed for Hollandia and a convoy on October 19. In Hollandia there was some confusion about our destination so we were obliged to anchor until October 23 when we sailed with a good sized convoy. We crossed the Equator 0445 hours, October 24 at 0° Latitude, 139° E. Longitude and after a smooth and uneventful trip arrived at San Pedro Bay, Leyte, P.I Port of Tacloban. Although our trip was uneventful the first and several succeeding night were anything but quiet and peaceful. The first night, with two anchors and 1000 feet of chain we rode out a typical Hollywood version of a tropical Typhoon at its worst. We did not drag our anchor, but it very narrow escapes, a Liberty Ship blew into us causing minor damage and major scares. The mental picture of only a life belt to keep a man above that raging water were saying what they thought to be their last prayers. The storm abated with no casualties on our ship. The nights of the 30 and 31 saw heavy raids on shore installations by enemy aircraft. Most of the ships in the harbor supplemented the Anti- aircraft fire of the shore batteries and several Japanese planes were shot down in flames accompanied by exuberant cheers from everyone watching the show. We had another close call when one of the flaming planes crashed on the forward deck of a troop laden Liberty Ship a bare 200 yards from our position. This organization commenced the month with a total strength of 27 Officers, 61 Warrant Officers and 320 Enlisted Men; the strength at the lose of the month was 27 Officers, 61 Warrant Officers and 332 Enlisted Men. Transfers in and out accounted for the changes. Sgt. Leonard A. Short, Radio Operator, P-720, died at APO 920; death by throat infection.
William N. Mathias 2nd Lt., Air Corps, Historical Officer.



Fifth Air Force V Air Force Service Command 59th Service Group November 1944 Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 72
Unit History, Month of November, 1944
We spent the first three days of this month on board ship anchored off Tacloban, Leyte, Philippine Islands and enjoyed the show put on by a cast of three namely our Anti-Aircraft and fighter - opposed by the Japanese Air Force. The audience was like one attending an old-fashioned "Meller- Dramer" in that they cheered heartily for the hero and booed and hissed the villain. This organization moved ashore on the 4th, tents were raised, fox holes dug and a little brush cleared before the evening raids commenced. Apparently Tojo over extended the operational capacities of his "Special Attack Corps" that night with innumerable individual raids, for they dropped off rapidly from then on. We have enjoyed practically uninterrupted sleep during the past 6 nights. Several of the men and officers were very nervous during the first raids but quickly became used to the sound of gun fire and quit sleeping in the foxholes. Every one realizes that we are very fortunate and leading a free and easy life compared to the infantry boys in the front, lines, especially since our camp area has proved so far superior to that of most other organizations; fresh food has been coming in quite regularly, so there is every reason for morale remaining on a high level. Two 63' rescue boats, P-716 and P-7 17, arrived on the 21st after a rough trip of' 113 hours from Moratai Island. One man was very pleased at having more sleep than any one else, it amounted to 10 hours total. Three 85' rescue boats, P-493, P-560 and P-6l, arrived on the 28th, they made the 1500 mile trip with one refueling stop in the Palau Group. Their trip was fairly smooth and everyone appeared to be in good condition. More rescue boats are expected daily. Due to a most unfortunate accident an 85' footer, P-492, was lost to the organization for some months to come. While traveling at 25 knots it was run on a reef and badly damaged; other boats tried in vain to pull it off but that night ground swells completed the job commenced by the reef. Two 85' boats at this base must be considered non-operational for the present, but one of the other three boats is standing off the strip maintaining a constant alert and ready to move on an instants notice. Our other two boats could be out of this harbor and on their way in a very few minutes if the need arose. All functions of the shore detachment are now in operation so if we can just get the wrinkles ironed out of Tec-Supp1y there Will be no reason, except a major overhaul, for any boat to be non-operational for more than a few hours. This organization commenced the month with 23 Officers, 61 Warrant Officer, 332 Enlisted Men and closed with the same. There were Many transfers both in and out but co-incidence indicated no change.
William N. Mathias 2nd Lt., Air Corps, Historical Officer.



Fifth Air Force V Air Force Service Command 59th Service Group November 1944 Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 72
1. Historical Report for month of December 1944. 2. Monthly Intelligence Summary for month of December 1944.
Unit History, Month of December 1944
Our Rescue Boats have been operation as such during the past month standing off Tacloban and Tanuan strips on the alert each day and in general fulfilling their mission and justifying their existence. Several. pilots were rescued from crashed airplanes and in one instance the rescue crews had to dive down under water and free the man from the cockpit. The fact that the other pilots are alive today is due solely to the speedy and efficient performance of all crew members. While not strictly in line with rescue work, W.O. McRee and crew of the P-717 had a very interesting trip taking a group of Intelligence Officers from FEAF around the island to Ormoc just after our landing at that point. These Officers wished to investigate a new type Japanese plane reported to have crashed there mission was completed successfully but not without a little excitement in the form of a strafing attack. Twin- fifties are now being installed on the bow of each boat as the result of this trip. It was found almost impossible. to bring the bridge guns to bear on a low flying airplane approaching from directly over the bow. In addition to the other routine missions in the near vicinity, a rescue was made by the last of our boats enroute from Australia to New Guinea and The Philippines. The P-363, under Lt. Ogilvie and crew rescued the crew of a B-24 from Hinchinbrook Island near Townsville. A C-47 buzzed them and dropped a message streamer indicating the location. Within 1 hour and 40 minutes the six survivors were aboard and headed for Townsville and what medical aid that could not be administered by the Surgical Technician aboard. Difficulties are still being experienced with the "V" drive assemblies on the 85' boats. This is an engineering fault and can only be completely eliminated by a change in the basic design. We are gradually learning to make them last longer and repair them more quickly when they do go out. Replacement parts are still the most troublesome single item when the picture is viewed as a whole, but with all higher headquarters so very interested in our operations we are confident that this problem will soon be eliminated. Subject: Monthly Intelligence Summary. To : 1. Individual Cases. a. One individual involving a Filipino was investigated during the past month. Filipinos, who are registered with P.C.A.U. and have been working steadily for us since our arrival, reported that a certain man had passed through our area several times (the latest being that morning) and had asked numerous questions concerning guns and ammunition in the immediate vicinity. The same afternoon he was approached in the camp area and held for questioning and investigation. This man identified himself a Jose L. Expino, registered P.C.A.U. No. 4628, and generally employed as a ditch digger by the pipeline engineers. All details of his explanation and personal history checked with statements made by his employer, and Filipino foreman, so apparently his trouble was idle curiosity and difficulty with the language. After a serious warning about future questions, he was released and no further action taken. 2. Rumors. There was considerable excitement caused in camp for several days by a speech supposedly made by President Roosevelt in which he promised all men, who entered the Philippines, prior to A-30, return to the states within 6 - 8 months. After it was pointed out that (1) the War Department was not sending entire organizations to the States, (2) the large number of men involved, (3) how unfair it would be to other seasoned troops, it was generally accepted as only wishful thinking. If mentioned at all now it is with a smile. We regularly tune in on the Zero Hour and other Japanese propaganda programs but they serve only to entertain, no one seems in the least swayed toward acceptance of their lies. 3. Morale. Several of our boats have now arrived and all but one are operating, some of them have successfully completed very interesting missions. Everyone has work, food is excellent for such an advanced base so our morale can be classed as excellent. Confidence that this organization will be included in the "Manila" move, also helps keep moral on a high level. 4. Unit covered. 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron. 5. Positive Security Measures. Plans for defense against ground or air borne attacks have been made and personnel acquainted with surrounding units and interwoven defense. Blackout conditions are rigidly enforced during a red alert. The guards, working in units of two, have been instructed to check each tent as soon as an alert is sounded and make curtain all personnel are awake. Personnel have been instructed to detain all suspicious persons and bring to the Commanding Officer for questioning and investigating. 6. Remarks and Questions. a. One Japanese 50 KG bomb was found buried nose up in the roadway near camp. It appeared to have been placed there before A-day but was never fuzed - fortunately for us as our trucks had been driving over it some time before discovery. Ordnance personnel were called to remove this suspected booby trap. b. No questions.
William N. Mathias 2nd Lt., Air Corps, Intelligence Officer.



Fifth Air Force V Air Force Service Command 5276 Composite Group 1 January - 31 January 1945. Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 72
1. Historical Report for month of January 1945. 2. Monthly Intelligence Summary for month of January 1945.
Unit History, Month of January 1945
Old age in the form of numerous minor breakdowns appears to be creeping up on our "F" boats. Generators, shaft bearings, engine bearings, stuffing boxes, packing glands, electrical systems, and many minor ailments are afflicting the boats much more frequently now than just a few months ago, although the crews continue to do an excellent job with maintenance and operation. The F-16 was placed in operation during the latter part of December after lengthy lay-up for major overhauls but did not manage to survive another complete month of operation. On the night of January 18, during a sever storm, she was blown into the breakers, caught in a trough while attempting to pull away into deep water, and blown well up into shallow water to swamp. Transportation Corps has advised that the vessel can be salvaged but that it will be a long, difficult job followed by a long period of non- operation while an absolutely complete overhaul is made. Our higher headquarters has not yet decided the most economical course to follow. Lt. Becher initiated a Report of Survey on the wrecked P-492 (see November Historical Report) when it was found impossible to secure dry docking facilities, material, or labor for the long rebuilding job necessary. Naval Repair Experts estimated that it will take four months to put it back in service. (see appendix) The P-493 was sent to Panaon Island to return an escaped P.W. to Military control. Oscar B Brown, 400th Ordnance Co. avn (B) was evacuated from a radar station after 18 months a prisoner, 14 months living with the guerilla forces, and a 36 hour open canoe ride from Mindanao. An accident just a year previous had cost him the use of his left leg but willing Filipinos had provided for his care, transportation and safe return. Lt. Smith and crew of the P-720 returned from a three day search mission with a score of 17 dead Japs and 3 prisoners. Information supplied by Filipino, on Carnasa Island enabled him to surprise 2 canoes of Japanese attempting escape to Luzon. (see appendix for further details) The P-493 and P-716 departed for Mindoro and operational control of the 309th Bomb Wing on 25 January. CWO Curtis and crew closed the month and established a new organizational record for the number rescued on a single mission. Twenty-eight survivors of a crashed C-46, personal baggage, and much of the planes most valuable equipment, were rescued from Cugo Island, 100 miles due south of Mindoro. Passengers for several Radar Stations, survivors, and crew totaled 48 persons to be rationed and quartered for 3 days aboard a single boat. The strength on 1 January was 28 Officers, 57 Warrant Officers, 328 Enlisted Men. The month closed with 27 Officers, 59 Warrant Officers, 328 Enlisted Men, a net gain of 1 Officer, and 2 Warrant Officers. Subject: Monthly Intelligence Summary. To : 1. Individual Cases. No individual cases investigated. 2. Rumors. Enemy propaganda and a few insignificant rumors reached this organization via Radio Tokio but interest in program is fast disappearing due mainly to the splendid programs presented over the local Armed Forces Radio Station. Personnel of this organization are well informed as to the progress of the war and consequently not swayed by extravagant enemy claims. 3. Morale. The Rescue Boats in this area are operating as was originally intended and have already made many rescues. This particular area seems to have "cooled off" so most of the boats crews are eager to move to a more advanced area where they can be of greater value. Rations continue to very good. These and other factors give this organization a moral rating of "Excellent". 4. Unit Covered. 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron. 5. Positive Security Measures. Plans for defense against ground or air borne attacks have been made and personnel acquainted with surrounding units and interwoven defense. Blackout conditions are rigidly enforced during a red alert. The guards, working in units of two, have been instructed to check each tent as soon as an alert is sounded and make curtain all personnel are awake. Personnel have been instructed to detain all suspicious persons and bring to the Commanding Officer for questioning and investigating. This organization has complied with the provisions of letter. Headquarters V AFSvC, dated 22 Dec 44, File AG 371.22 (A.2) Subject, Security, and letter. Headquarters, 59th Service Group, dated 2 January 1945, Subject, Security. 6. Remarks and Questions. a. The undersigned has devoted approximately 15% of his time to Intelligence work. b. No questions.
William N. Mathias 2nd Lt., Air Corps, Adjutant.
Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 72 RESCUE MISSION REPORT
Rescue Boat P-720 Station Tacloban Master Lt. R. Smith Mission ordered by Lt. McDonald at 0800 hrs 15 Jan 1945 Departed from anchorage at 1000 hrs. Speed 12 -K.P.M. Position of Objective as reported --- Actual Position when found ___ Objective of mission (Plane, craft) To get Information on Down Aircraft Type (if Plane) --- Arrived at reported position at * see below for details hrs. Elapsed time from call --- Time of rescue --- hrs --- 194_. Returned to --- at --- hrs ---. Weather conditions good Sea smooth Visability good Number of planes assisting none Type --- Was radio contact maintained with tower? None Type --- Number of Prisoner/Evacuation 3/1 Bodies recovered --- Was Medical attention given survivors? First Aid How? Motormack trans from Pt with broken nose Treated to stop bleeding. If survivors already picked up on arrival at position, By whom? (Give particulars) ---
R.M. Smith 2nd Lt. AC
Detail report P-720
The P-720 departed from its base at 1000 15 Jan 1945 on a special mission accompanied by, one Australian Officer and three men, and a Filipino interpreter, with a list of plane that had been reported down during the month of December in and around the southwest coast of Leyte. The first stop was at Carigara at which place there was a P-51 set down on the beach out of gas. The pilot had been evacuated by the 32nd Div and F's were guarding the plane. Mr. Scott went a shore and got the information from the Div CP. The next stop was Bilran, Biliran where the Mayor of the district had heard that a plane had been reported down in the mountains about Dec 27. Anchored for the night and prepared for a shore party for the next morning. The trip on foot up the into the hills was useless as it proved that a native had given false information. The Mayor gave informer a three month jail sentence. Returned to the ship and remained at the anchorage there. 17 Jan departed for Carnasa Island. A Filipino sail boat attracted our attention and we went over to it. They were people from Cadiz, Negroes and they us military information and a rough hand drawn map of Jap air Base, with 30 single engine fighters showing dispersal area and ammo and fuel dumps. Mr. Scott took all the information an turned it over to A-2. On approach to the Island of Carnasa a native canoe met us and stated that six airmen had been evacuated the week before by a PBY. Also that two large sail boats with twenty Japs had been there that night. On rounding the Island we were able to surprise the nearest boat. On approaching it the Japs held there rifle fire to get us in close enough to use hand grenades, fired on them at close range sinking the boat. Picked up three survivors as prisoners. The other boat had a small machine (Est. Approx. cal 30) opened up with our twin 50's and shot up the Jap boat. Made for Biliran and placed prisoners in the town jail for the night. Proceeded to Leyte village where Mr. Scott went ashore and found the pilot that was reported there had already been evacuated. Returned to Biliran and anchored for the night. 18 Jan departed from Biliran for Base, with three Jap prisoners.
Remarks
A list of the type that was given to Mr. Scott was a little too old. That is the latest crash of the whole list was Dec 27, which was three weeks old and the rest ranged back as far as eight weeks. I believe that if the information was passed back to the 14th within the week that its boat could bring back many airmen that are now making their way back by themselves.
R.M. Smith 2nd Lt. AC



Fifth Air Force V Air Force Service Command 5276 Composite Group 1 February - 28 February 1945. Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 72
1. Historical Report for month of February 1945. 2. Monthly Intelligence Summary for month of February 1945.
Unit History, Month of February 1945
This past month has been very quiet one for the organization. The boats at this base have either been under repair of standing their 24 hour period of strip alert. Four more boats, P-360, P-560, P-720 and P-717, were sent to Mindoro and then on to Subic Bay on Luzon. Up until the end of February we had not received a mission report from them although it is understood they are in good condition and operating on routine mission. Towards the close of the month we received word that the P-361, P-362, P-364, P-365, P-398 and P-718 departed from Biak on 20 February under navy tow. This will save many hours running time on the engines and help reduce the work of our maintenance department. When these boats arrive the five 45' boats and six sea sleds will be the only ones remaining behind headquarters. Most of us in headquarters are tired of this location after four months and are looking forward to a move to Luzon in the comparatively near future. The P-592 and P-356 are still at Moratai working for the 15th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron and from all reports reaching this headquarters are doing a wonderful job of resupply to out lying Radar stations and special rescue missions. While the month has been quiet in the sense that there have been no air raids or spectacular missions, all sections have been very busy keeping up with their work. Maintenance, Communications, Armament, and Supply have been contributing their support to the war effort but the Orderly Room continues to fight it with paper and numerous reports. The strength on 1 February was 27 Officers, 59 Warrant Officers, and 328 Enlisted Men. On 28 February, the strength was 27 Officers, 60 Warrant Officers, and 333 Enlisted Men; a net gain of 1 Warrant Officer and 5 Enlisted Men. 2nd Lt. Albert T. Becher received a well deserved promotion to 1st Lt. after sixteen months in grade. Subject: Monthly Intelligence Summary. To : 1. Individual Cases. No individual cases investigated. 2. Rumors. More speculation than rumor existed for awhile concerning the possibility of a landing on the coast of China or on Iwo Jima. This seemed to have originated from two sources (1) story that local Quartermasters were issuing woolen clothing, (2) the continuous pounding of Iwo Jima for more than sixty consecutive days. The rumor was small and had caused very little excitement so rather than risk enlarging and spreading it, the matter was dropped. The war seems to be progressing too swiftly for the rumors to keep pace. Almost everyone has his own private opinion as to the termination of the war and the steps leading to it, but such rumors cause no official worries. This organization has practically ceased listening to the propaganda programs from Japanese sources, due to the excellent programs presented by our local radio station, WVTK. 3. Morale. Several boats are now at more advanced bases performing their basic mission; several more are ready to depart for other forward bases. The war is progressing swiftly, and everyone feels that he is making a contribution, even if very small. Morale can be classed as excellent. 4. Unit Covered. 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron. 5. Positive Security Measures. Plans for defense against ground or air borne attacks have been made and personnel acquainted with surrounding units and interwoven defense. Blackout conditions are rigidly enforced during a red alert. The guards, working in units of two, have been instructed to check each tent as soon as an alert is sounded and make curtain all personnel are awake. Personnel have been instructed to detain all suspicious persons and bring to the Commanding Officer for questioning and investigating. 6. Remarks and Questions. a. The undersigned has devoted approximately 15% of his time to Intelligence work. b. No questions.
William N. Mathias 2nd Lt., Air Corps, Adjutant.
Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 72
RESCUE MISSION REPORT
Rescue Boat P-363 Station APO 72 Master A.P. Ogilvie Mission ordered by 14th ERBS at 0900 hrs 7 Feb 1945 Departed from anchorage at 1200 hrs. Speed 17 -K.P.M. Position of Objective as reported Borongas Actual Position when found same Objective of mission (Plane, craft) Evacuation Type (if Plane) --- Arrived at reported position at 1030 Feb 8 hrs. Elapsed time from call -- Time of rescue 0700 hrs Feb 10 1945. Returned to Anchorage at 1800 hrs. Weather conditions good Sea Moderate Visibility Fair Number of planes assisting None Type --- Was radio contact maintained with tower? Yes Type 4475 Number of Evacuation 9 Bodies recovered --- Was Medical attention given survivors? No How?
Notes
P-363 anchored overnight at Guinan Hbr. Then to Borongas where they picked up the following: Miss Maguire and two other Filipino women Capt. William T. Sandalls CIC 8th Army Capt. McCillioudy CIC 8th Army Robert L. Kang (Civilian agent CIC 8th Army) Arthur Wright (Civilian agent CIC 8th Army) Filipino Male name unknown Japanese Prisoner name unknown
Allan P. Ogilvio 2nd Lt. Air Corps Master P-363
Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 72
RESCUE MISSION REPORT
Rescue Boat P-360 Station APO 72 Master Lt. M Steinberg. Mission ordered by 14th ERBS at 0730 hrs 8 Feb 1945 Departed from Anchorage at 0800 hrs. Speed 20 K.P.M. Position of Objective as reported Desolation Point, Dinogat Island. Actual Position when found Same Objective of mission (Plane, craft) Evacuate 1 E.M. Type (if Plane) --- Arrived at reported position at 1130 hrs. Elapsed time from call 4 hrs. Time of rescue 1130 hrs Feb 8 1945. Returned to Anchorage at 1600 hrs. Weather conditions Hazy Sea Calm Visibility Fair Number of planes assisting None Type --- Was radio contact maintained with tower? No Type Used 4335 to contact shore station Number of survivors rescued 1 Bodies recovered --- Was Medical attention given survivors? No How? ---
Morris Steinberg 2nd Lt. Air Corps Master P-360
Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 72 RESCUE MISSION REPORT
Rescue Boat P-717 Station APO 72 Master J.F. McRee Mission ordered by 14th ERBS at 1700 hrs 11 Feb 1945 Departed from Anchorage at 1715 hrs. Speed 19 -K.P.M. Position of Objective as reported Pintayan Actual Position when found Same Objective of mission (Plane, craft) Evacuation Type (if Plane) --- Arrived at reported position at 2240 hrs. Elapsed time from call 5 hrs 40min. Time of rescue 2240 / 0042 hrs Feb 11 / 12 1945. Returned to Dalag at 0430 hrs. Weather conditions Windy Sea Moderate Visibility Fair Number of planes assisting None Type --- Was radio contact maintained with tower? Yes Type 4475 Number of survivors rescued 8 Bodies recovered --- Was Medical attention given survivors? Yes How? Capt. Randall, a doctor assigned to ATC was along. He tended all patients with assistance of medical
James F. McRee JOJG USA Master P-717



        There seem to be no unit history reports for the months March and 
        April



Fifth Air Force 5th Emergency Rescue Group 1 May - 31 May 1945. Headquarters 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron APO 75
1. Historical Report for month of May 1945. 2. Monthly Intelligence Summary for month of May 1945.
Unit History, Month of May 1945
The first part of the month found the entire shore detachment very busy moving camp from the staging area on Rizal Avenue to our permanent location on Dewey Boulevard. Base Ordnance removed four-five inch Japanese Dual-purpose guns from the area. Then the 4th Engineer Special Brigade provided a bull dozer to level everything and place it in condition for occupation. Squad tents were set-up for enlisted personnel, pyramidals for the officers, functions established, area fenced, and life settled back to routine. We had hoped to occupy a section of the Boulevard Apartment Hotel, which is adjacent to our area, but higher headquarters requires the space for quartering ranking officers, so, at the close of the month, it appears that we will remain in tents for the duration of our stay in Manila. During the month five of our new 63' boats arrived at this base, all of them in need of radio changes. Radios were equipped with incorrect crystals which had to be changed before boats could operate in this area. One boat which remained in Leyte for engine adjustments, is expected shortly after the 1st of June. Tragedy again struck the squadron, this time at Dirigue Inlet on the northern tip of Luzon when an 85' boat (P-493) was lost in a storm, at 0200 hrs. while lying at anchor, the one inch cable parted; in less than two minutes, the boat was thrown on coral niggerheads. The wheelswere pounded up through the dispensary floor almost immediately making it impossible to move the boat under its own power. Fortunately however no personnel were lost or injured. Several different agencies surveyed the boat and all agreed that it was impractical to salvage the hull with equipment available in this theater. The crew remained on the beach and, by an arrangement similar to a breeches buoy, salvaged much valuable equipment such as generators, radios, batteries etc. Most of us were, at first, well pleased to be located in large city, but the novelty has worn off and the full effect of high prices and the multiple opportunities of spending money are being felt. In other words every one is "broke", shortly after payday. Maintenance of the boats and problems involved should be greatly simplified by the recent acquisition of the FS-218 for such purposes. CNO Gontzen and his "Key men" are to be in charge. 2nd Lts. Haim, Henderson, Hoskin, Ogden, Ogilive, Seymour and Thilk were notified on 15 May of their promotion to 1st Lt on the 28 April. They had been in grade for a long period of time and well deserved the promotion. The announcement of the readjustment and Rehabilitation program was well received but with out a great deal of excitement. Largest item causing complaints was the credit allowed for overseas service. Most personnel agreed that at least one more point should have been authorized. The strength varied as follows: Officers Warrant Officers Enlisted Men 31 May 45 28 63 356 1 May 45 26 56 336 Net Gain 2 7 20
William N. Mathias 2nd Lt., Air Corps, Adjutant.
Monthly Intelligence Summary Period from 20 April 45 to 20 May 45
1. Individual cases No individual cases investigated. 2. Rumors A vicious rumor seems to circulating among some of the Fillipino people, that forty percent of the American soldiers are infected by Venereal Disease. This arrived at Headquarters via on of our personnel who had met a Fillipino girl, who in turn had heard it from another Fillipino. The extent of this rumor is unknown, but could very possibly be enemy propaganda intended to create a feeling of ill-will and distrust. 3. Propaganda Activity No enemy propaganda activity was noted in this organization. Personnel listen to local broadcasting stations almost exclusively. Seldom if ever, do they tune in on Radio Tokio. 4. Morale It is necessary to drop the morale rating for this period from a pervious excellent to very good. The slowness and uncertainty of Rotation and T.D. is one cause. Another is the point system authorized for use in connection with the adjusted Service Rating Cards. Most personnel feel that more credit should be given to service in forward areas, particularly during the early days of that theater when such service involved actual hardship. Contrary to expectations our new location has caused, in some personnel, a more intensified feeling of homesickness than the "Jungle" induced. 5. Units covered by this report 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron. 6. Positive Security Measures The personnel area has now been fenced and it is hoped that material to fence the entire squadron area will soon be available. A general policy has been established that no Fillipino or others will enter this area, laundry men, peddlers, ect., conduct their business through the proper sections and their activities are controlled by Squadron Headquarters. Two guards are posted, during the hours of darkness to prevent pilferage and petty thievery. 7. Remarks and Questions The undersign has devoted approximately 10% of his time to intelligence work. No questions.
William N. Mathias 2nd Lt., Air Corps, Adjutant.



Fifth Air Force 5th Emergency Rescue Group 1 June - 30 June 1945. HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 75
UNIT HISTORY FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE 1945
The balance of our new 63' boats arrived at Manila during the first part of this month and were quickly put to work. Crystals for the radios had been made available so the job of making the boats operational was a minor one. They were dispatched to Dagupan, Mariveles, Marinduque, and Mindoro. One of these boats, P-666, came to grief on the 30th of June. While proceeding at full speed the boat hit a reef, the bow section opened and the boat immediately began to fill with water. Although the crew made heroic effort to save it, they could not keep ahead of the incoming water so were forced to abandon their ship which sank in fairly deep water; part of the flying bridge and mast are now above the surface of the water. An investigation is now being conducted to fix responsibility. Two boats, P-363 and P-357, were sent to Aparri soon after the occupation. No report has been received from them up till this date but it should be a wonderful spot for Rescue boats to cover the air strikes to the Northwest. While the boats are well spread over the Philippine Area, this has been a slow month. They have had very little action with the exception of those stationed at Marinduque. The FS-218 commenced functioning as a maintenance unit for this organization, and has been swamped with work. They have already accomplished a great deal but there is no fear of them running out of work, with boats there will always be more than enough for them to do. Our months of hoping and sweating have finally born fruit - the dry dock has finally arrived from Biak. This will do wonders towards speeding up our repair business. Our boats have had to wait weeks at a time before being able to get up on a Naval or Transportation Corps dry dock. Lt. Albert T. Becher finally started on his way home after more than 38 months service in this theater. He was the first and only member of this organization thus far, to be returned to the Unites States under the Readjustment Policy. He had accumulated 113 points as of 12 May 1945. All personnel are keenly interested and watching, somewhat skeptically to be sure, for the announcement of the next quota, especially a certain Lieutenant with 110 points. Most of the men have expressed the opinion that more credit should have been allowed for overseas service. This is especially true when it is realized that we have several men with 35 months overseas service and only 36 months in the army, who's R.R. scores are quite low compared to others. They, under the present system, can look forward to a number of months further service over here. The following men, over forty years of age, applied for discharge: Sgt. Paul Teachout 34248263 T/Sgt. James C. Adams 34315438 Pvt. Eugene E. Caulk 39300010 Shortly thereafter they received orders to proceed to the United States for the purpose of being discharged. Sgt. John J. Cummings was granted an Emergency Furlough. The strength varied as follows: 30 June 1945 28 Officers 64 Warrant Officers 354 Enlisted Men 1 June 1945 28 Officers 62 Warrant Officers 357 Enlisted Men Net gain or lost 0 Officers +2 Warrant Officers -3 Enlisted Men
William N. Mathias 2nd Lt., Air Corps, Adjutant.
Monthly Intelligence Summary Period from 20 May 45 to 20 June 45
1. Individual cases No individual cases investigated. 2. Rumors A rumor has been circulating in the organization for the past three weeks that the entire 5th Air Force is moving to Okinawa. Also that 85% of Filipino women have a Venereal disease. 3. Propaganda No enemy propaganda activity has been noted in this organization unless the rumor of the percentage of Venereal disease mentioned above could be the activity of enemy agents with the idea of breaking down the morale of the Armed Forces and civilians. 4. Morale Morale of this unit may be classified as very good. a. Factors contributing to raising the morale of the unit are: 1. Addition of new Mess facilities such as a new Mess Hall giving adequate protection from the weather, and the addition of a refrigerating unit for food protection. 2. The addition of a repair ship has stimulated the boat crews in such as repairs can be more easily made. b. Factors lowering the morale are: 1. The point system. Men having long service over seas resent men just coming over seas that have as many points as they, and still have not had combat duty. 2. Inactivity of the new boats that have recently arrived in the Theatre has lowered the morale of their crews. This however has been remedied as the addition of the necessary equipment has been completed and they are now operational. 5. Units covered by this report 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron. 6. Positive Security Measures Civilians not allowed in Squadron Area. Laundrymen and others with business transactions with the Organization conduct their business through proper sections. Armed Guard is maintained in the area from the hours of darkness to daylight. 7. Remarks and Questions The undersign was assigned as Squadron Intelligence Officer on 27 May 1945 and assumed his duties 5 June 1945.
Kenneth A. Chapman 1st Lt. Air Corps Intelligence Officer



HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 75 Fifth Air Force 5th Emergency Rescue Group 1 July - 31 July 1945.
UNIT HISTORY FOR THE MONTH OF JULY 1945
The early part of the month found the greater part of the Squadron assisting in some way in getting the large number of boats here for repairs and recommissioning into condition. The greater part of this responsibility fell upon the shoulders of the maintenance crew of the newly acquired maintenance boat FS 218. The dry dock was put into active use with a schedule for the docking of the boats which due to long periods of time between their last docking were badly in need of work below the water line. The work on the dry dock was placed under the supervision of WO Harold S, Smith, who soon had things running very smoothly and the work went forward at a fine rate. WO Smith's excellent work was marred only by an accident when the crank used to start the pumps flew off during the starting operation and hit him on the left side of the face, laying him low with a blow that would have finished an ordinary mans We were glad to hear that the sight of his left eye would not be affected and are anxiously awaiting a report on the condition of his jaw bone which absorbed the greater part of the blow. The middle of the month found our first convoy of crash boats, both 85's and 63's, getting under way to meet a convoy of LSTs that was to tow them to their destination. It was the first time that we had attempted such a feat, and extensive preparations were necessary for all boats had to be properly bridled for a trip of such a great distance. Weather conditions were adverse. and due to the LSTs being given no instructions other than to maintain a convoy speed of 10 knots, it became necessary for the boats to break away from the convoy and the Crash Boats were spread up and down the West Coast of Luzon. The skippers did some excellent work in bringing their respective craft to various ports. After minor repairs they again assembled at Subic Bay, leaving at a later date for their destination in another convoy and Lt. Steinberg. Operations Officer, is awaiting information as to the success of the trip that he may prepare for future convoys. It appears that no month would be complete in the Squadron without a boat parting a mooring line. and heading for the beach. This month was no exception for during a heavy blow two of the new 63'. broke away and headed for the sea wall bordering Dewey Boulevard. The boats were still in their cradles due to plans to ship them later to a new location, The cradles proved to be an asset an they held the boats off the sea wall until a tow was set up, and only minor damage was done to either boat. The exodus of personnel to the States this month has been rather gratifying for early in the month S/Sgt James L. Musick received his orders permitting him to go back on Emergency Leave for the purpose of settling his father's estate. A quota of one officer and one enlisted man was received under the Readjustment Policy. Lt. William N. Mathias, our adjutant, with 110 point. received the nod to cover the officers quota, and Sgt. Madison H, Young, with 118 points represented the enlisted men. It was with a bit of regret that we parted with "Bill" for he was a sparkplug of activity but we know how anxious he was to see his wife and family after a separation of 30 months. CWO William H. Delano who had been filling the position of Personnel Officer has taken over Lt. Mathias's work and should be able to handle the job in a capable manner. We closed the month with ever indication that before too long the whole Squadron would be together for the first time since its activation, June 7. 1944. All detachments at Biak, Leyte and Oro Bay had been closed out, and once the remainder of the Biak Detachment under WO Clay Baker arrives the unit will be completely assembled. The strength varied as follows: 31 July 1945 24 Officers 64 Warrant Officers 344 Enlisted Men 1 July 1945 28 Officers 64 Warrant Officers 353 Enlisted Men Net gain or lost -4 Officers 0 Warrant Officers -9 Enlisted Men
William H. Delano CWO, U.S.A. Adjutant.



    There seems to be no unit history reports for the months of August, 
    September, October, and November.



HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 503 Fifth Air Force 5th Bomber Command 1 Dec - 31 Dec 1945.
Key personnel of the 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron for the month of December 45 were as follows: Commanding Officer 1st Lt. Edward W. Zulauf. Adjutant 2nd Lt. Robert O. Harrison Supply Officer 2nd Lt. Joseph W. House Operations Officer 2nd Lt. David M. Stair Communications Officer 2nd Lt. Howard I. Grim Engineering Officer 1st Lt. James F. Wood On 1 December 1945 the 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron was located at Atsugi Air Field, APO 328, but on the same date arrangements had been made for moving to a new location in Yokohama. The actual movement was started 3 December and completed the next day. The entire outfit was moved to Yokohama leaving no 14th personnel in Atsugi. The new location is excellent for this type of outfit though suitable docking facilities are yet to be procured. The harbor at the present location of the 14th is unprotected from weather conditions and tends to get very rough during windy or other unusual weather conditions. The primary missions were two-fold for the remainder of the month, (1) getting a supply system set up in the new location and, (2) to get the remainder of the boats brought up from Manila and Nagoya. At present supply facilities have been made available to the squadron for most of our needs, but a suitable system of boat maintenance has yet to be set up. All boats, with the exception of one, have been moved to the Yokohama base and are at present ties up here. The one boat not here is located at Nagoya harbor. Just when it will be moved up to Yokohama is unknown. In the mean time crews are changed on it at intervals and food carried to them whenever needed. On 23 December the LSD-13 arrived from Manila with the following boats: P-546, P-356, P-362, P-364, P-592, P-626, and P-695, and one barge. On 31 December the LSD-19 arrived from Manila with boats P-355 and P-719. The entire month was spent repairing, cleaning and maintaining the boats. The boats were only one-third manned because of personnel shortages. The building in which 14th Headquarters is now located is adequate for all shore personnel and the messing and bathing facilities are provided for the entire organization. Boat crewmembers are living on the boats but while tied up on the harbor they come ashore for meals. The commanding officer was in Manila from 17 Dec to 30 Dec arranging for movement of the boats and their crews to this location as mentioned above. At present there are no boats nor men of this organization in Manila. Obtaining and keeping personnel still remains one of our major problems. The new requirements for redeployment, effective 1 Dec made eligible a higher percentage of our still remaining Officers and Enlisted men. Though we had more personnel at the end of the month than at the beginning the outfit was in worse shape because many of our experienced were replaced by inexperienced personnel. At he beginning of the month (M/R 1Dec) there were 39 EM and 40 officers assigned and on 31 Dec 54 EM and 18 officers. During the time between we had 28 EM and officers who were transferred for redeployment and 48 EM and officers assigned for duty from various organizations. Christmas was spent very quietly by the organization with hardly any interruption from the daily schedule. The cook did a "bang up" job on the preparation of dinner and it was thoroughly enjoyed by all. Through the efforts of Lt. Grim and Lt. Hitchens a very large and beautiful Christmas tree was set up in the mess hall. With abundance of decorations and lights it did more to remind the outfit that it was Christmas than anything else. The one event to mar the holiday was the disappearance on Christmas Eve night of Cpl. Everett S. Lindow. His disappearance was reported on the afternoon of 25 Dec, but since a holiday had been given it was thought at first he might have possibly stayed overtime in town, but when, on the 26th of Dec, the skiff in which he was last seen was found approximately three miles south of the boat anchorage an investigation was immediately began and the local Provost Marshall notified. The month ended with no spectacular occurrences, but with the hopes of the outfit that the early part of 1946 will find the 14th Emer Res Boat Squadron again operational.
Robert O Harrison 2nd Lt. Air Corps Squadron Historian
HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 503
12 Dec 45 SQUADRON ORDER ) : NUMBER 38 ) 1. 2ND Lt. Howard L. Grim, 0-871804, AC, is hereby aptd SQ Comm and CrypteSec O. 2. 1st Lt James F Wood, 0-522513, AC, is hereby aptd Sq Maint and Engineering O. 3. 2nd Lt David M Stair, 0-2066896,AC, is hereby aptd Sq Opns O. 4. Under provisions of Charge 5 AR 615-5 Pvt Edward S Hummer, 35878892 is hereby promoted to grade of Private First Class. 5. 2nd Lt Joseph W House, 0-588982, AC is hereby aptd Sq Supply O vice 1st Lt James F Henry, 0-1591796, AC, reld. By Oder of Lt Zulauf:
Robert O Harrison 2nd Lt. Air Corps Adjutant
HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 503
13 Dec 45 SQUADRON ORDER ) : NUMBER 39 ) 1. Under the provisions of paragraph 5 AR 615-5 Sgt Lester Ferrand 35373048, 14th Emer Res Boat Sq, is promoted to the grade of Staff Sergeant (Temp) effective this date.
Edward W. Zulauf 1st Lt AC. Commanding
HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 503
14 Dec 45 SQUADRON ORDER ) : NUMBER 40 ) 1. 2nd Lt Howard L Grim 0-871804 is aptd sq Special Service Officer and I&E Officer, in addition to other dys. 2. 2nd Lt David M Stair 0-2066896 is aptd CO Kanoya Det 14th Emer Res Boat Sq vice WOJG Norris E Bleck W-2133303 reld. 3. UP of par 6 AR 615-5 Cpl Donald A Campbell 36775934 14th Emer Res Boat Sq is promoted to the grade of Sergeant (Temp) effective this date. 4. So much of par I SO 39 dtd 13 Dec 45 as reads par 5 AR 615-5 is amended to read par 6 AR 615-5 SD/TS-133. 5. 2nd Lt David M Stair, 0-2066896 is reld of duty as squadron Operation Officer. 6. 1st Lt James F Wood 0-522513 AC is aptd Squadron Transportation Officer in addition to other duties.
Edward W. Zulauf 1st Lt AC. Commanding




HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 503 Fifth Air Force 5th Bomber Command 1 Jan - 31 Jan 1946.
SUBJECT: Transmittal of Monthly Organizational History TO : Commanding Officer V Bomber Command APO 994 1. Transmitted herewith is Squadron History Report of 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron for month January 1946. 2. The material submitted was prepared by 2nd Lt. Robert O Harrison. Facts and observations in the not otherwise. credited are based on the personnel knowledge and opinions of Lt. Harrison. FOR THE COMMANDING OFFICER
Robert O Harrison 2nd Lt. Air Corps Adjutant
1. KEY PERSONNEL Commanding Officer Bernhardt W. Junnila 1st Lt. AC Adjutant Robert O Harrison 2nd Lt. AC Operations Officer William G Rusch 2nd Lt. AC Supply Officer Joseph W House 2nd Lt. ac Communications Officer Howard L Grim 2nd Lt. AC Engineering Officer James F Wood 1st Lt. AC 2. STRENGTH a. The total strength of the squadron fluctuated back and fourth during the month but the total for the first of the month and the total for the last of the month showed very little variation. 1. Total EM 1 Jan 46 54 Gained 38 Lost 35 Total EM 31 Jan 46 57 2. Total Officers 1 Jan 46 18 Gained 12 Lost 7 Total Officers 31 Jan 46 23 b. Personnel on Flying Status 1. Enlisted Men 0 2. Officers 15 c. Cpl Everett S Lindow who was reported as AWOL on 25 December 1945 was picked up as deceased on 17 Jan 46 after a body was recovered from Yokohama Bay and identified as that of Cpl Lindow. d. On 8 January 46 1st Lt. Edward W Zulauf was relieved of duties as Commanding Officer for redeployment to U.S. and discharge. 1st Lt. Bernhardt W Junnila succeed Lt. Zulauf as Squadron Commander on 8 January 46. 3. AIRCRAFT ASSIGNED & TYPE (inapplicable) 4. TYPE EQUIPMENT USED 1. 85 Foot Crash Boats 2. 63 Foot Crash Boats 3. Supply Barge. 4. Tug Boat 5. SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS a. An alert boat was maintained at all hours during the month up to and including 28 January 46. The alert boat schedule had to be discontinued because of lack of experienced personnel to man it. On 15 January a call was radioed in for dispatching Rescue Boats to pick up a crew supposedly downed a few miles from Yokohama. Rescue Boats P-355 and P-560 was dispatched to the given location but they were called back after two hours because the original message had given the wrong location and the crash was out of range for the 14th. That was the only alert call answered during the month. b. On 24 Jan one boat was sent to Shimoda in an effort to determine the availability and desirability of Shimoda as a boat station for this organization. No definite conclusion was reached and Shimoda is still under consideration as a possible base. The boat returned from Shimoda on 27 Jan. c. Two boats were destroyed during the month. P-592 was washed ashore on 7 January during a storm and heavy ground swells and has been surveyed since it was rendered unrepairable. P-561, which is stationed at Nagoya awaiting repairs, was set afire by sparks from batteries on 20 Jan and extensive damages resulted. An investigation is still in progress and' survey of the boat is pending at present. d. Boat P-560 arrived in Yokohama 14 January from Nagoya where it had been anchored temporarily while awaiting repairs. As soon as final disposition is made of P-561 as a result of the fire all 14th boats will be at the Yokohama anchorage, since that is the only one still not present. e. An M/T boat was acquired from 1054th Engineers APO 503 during the month for use by' this organization. 1. Enlisted Men 0 2. Officers 15 c. Cpl Everett S Lindow who was reported as AWOL on 25 December 1945 was picked up as deceased on 17 Jan 46 after a body was recovered from Yokohama Bay and identified as that of Cpl Lindow. d. On 8 January 46 1st Lt. Edward W Zulauf was relieved of duties as Commanding Officer for redeployment to U.S. and discharge. 1st Lt. Bernhardt W Junnila succeed Lt. Zulauf as Squadron Commander on 8 January 46. 6. Summary of Training Progress a. Training in the squadron during the month was comprised mostly of on-the-job training with experienced personnel, when available, as supervisors. Experienced personnel were very scarce and there were not enough for one to be assigned to each boat, though all boat crews received some supervision from experienced personnel. A Marine school was initiated 7 January in an effort to teach men, who had had no previous boating experience, some of the basic principles of boating. The results of the school were good but it had to be discontinued before the months end because of the increasing lack of competent instructor personnel. 7. Specific Problems a. Administration---Practically all experienced administrative personnel were lost during the month and were replaced by completely inexperienced personnel. After a period of on-the-job training for the personnel this problem should automatically be eliminated. b. Operations---The problems of operations were twofold during the month (1) loss of a great majority of experienced Officer and Enlisted personnel and lack of replacement even in numbers, and (2) lack of Marine supplies for 2nd echelon maintenance and inadequate 3rd and 4th echelon maintenance. Both of these problems were all aviated somewhat by good work of crews concerned on some of the boats, but both still remain a big problem. c. Personnel---Shortage of personnel in both operations and administration, as mentioned before, is the main problem at present. Available men were split up into skeleton crews so that no boat would be entirely without personnel. d. Supply---No additional problems except as given under operations. e. Engineering--- No additional problems except as given under operations. 8. Additional Duties Undertaken by Organization and Connected Problems Not applicable. 9. Information and Recreational Activities and Station Life a. The 14th was located at Yokohama, Honshu, Japan APO 503 during the entire month of January. b. A few improvements were added during the month to add to comforts, enjoyment, and possibly morale building of the personnel. A movie projector was procured by the organization and movies are shown four times weekly. Also a squadron PX was established during the month and all personnel have adequately been served by it in obtaining beer, candy, cigarettes, stationery supplies, and other usual PX commodities. c. Athletic equipment at present is inadequate but action has been taken to obtain enough equipment to service the squadron. 10. Special Projects Undertaken None 11. Exhibits None
HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 503
3 Jan 46 SQUADRON ORDER ) : NUMBER 1 ) 1. UP of par 6 AR 615-5 and radio EB 1045 C Hq VBC dtd 29 Nov 45 the temp promotion of the fol named EM is announced eff this date: Aptd to M Sgt T Sgt Frank P Cutsinger 34053536 080 56 Aptd to Sgt Cpl Asa P Harris 18214262 080 30 Aptd to Cpl Pfc Herman L Likerman 15331587 060 31 2. 2nd Lt. Robert O Harrison 0513501 AC is Aptd SQ Historical Officer. 3. 1st Lt. Bernhardt W Junnila 01594267 AC is Aptd SQ Operation Officer. 4. 2nd Lt. William G Rusch 02076748 AC is Aptd SQ Summary Court Officer.
Edward W Zulauf 1st Lt. Air Corps Commanding
HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 503
7 Jan 46 SQUADRON ORDER ) : NUMBER 2 ) 1. Under provision of par 6 AR 615-5 and radio EB 1045 Hq Fifth Bomber Command, dated 29 Nov 45, Sgt Howard W Buck Jr. 42121180 AC (ASRS 20) is promoted to the grade of Staff Sergeant (Temporary), effective this date. 2. Under provision of par 6 AR 615-5 and radio message EB 1045C. Hq Fifth Bomber Command, dated 29 Nov 45 Cpl George C. Estes Jr. 384735835 AC (ASR 29) is promoted to the grade of Sergeant (Temporary) effective this date.
Edward W Zulauf 1st Lt. Air Corps Commanding
HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 503
8 Jan 46 SQUADRON ORDER ) : NUMBER 3 ) 1. Incompliance with paragraph 4(c) Fifth Air Force Regulation 80-1, dated 12 December 1945, 2nd Lt. Robert O. Harrison 0-513501 AC (MOS 2110) is appointed Records Officer of the 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron. 2. 2nd Lt. Walter Van Savage 02078334 AC is appointed Special Service and I&E Officer. 3. 2nd Lt. Walter Van Savage 02078334 AC is appointed Squadron Post Exchange Officer. 4. 2nd Lt. Walter Van Savage 02078334 AC is appointed Unit Recruiting Officer.
Bernhardt W. Junnila 1st Lt. Air Corps Commanding
HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 503
16 Jan 46 SQUADRON ORDER ) : NUMBER 4 ) 1. 2nd Lt. William G. Rusch 02076748, AC is appointed Squadron Operations Officer vice 1st Lt. Bernhardt W. Junnila relieved. 2. 2nd Lt. Howard L. Grim 0-871804 is relieved of duties of Squadron Special Service and Information and Education Officer effective 8 January 1946.
Bernhardt W. Junnila 1st Lt. Air Corps Commanding
HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 503
23 Jan 46 SQUADRON ORDER ) : NUMBER 5 ) 1. Under provision of par 6 AR 615-5 and radio EB 1045 C Hq Fifth Bomber Command, dated 29 Nov. 29 1945, Cpl Herbert A Harthum 36457744 AC (ASRS 29) ( NMS 34) is promoted to the grade of Segeant (Temporary), effective this date.
Bernhardt W. Junnila 1st Lt. Air Corps Commanding



HEADQUARTERS 14th EMERGENCY RESCUE BOAT SQUADRON APO 503 Fifth Air Force 5th Bomber Command 1 March - 25 March 1946.
SUBJECT : Transmittal of Monthly Organizational History TO : Commanding General Army Air Corps ATTENTION : Ass't C of AS Intelligence Historical Div. 1. Transmitted herewith is Squadron History Report of 14th Emergency Rescue Boat Squadron for the period 1 March 1946 to 25 March 1946. 2. The material submitted was prepared by 1st Lt. Robert O Harrison. Facts and observations in the narrative and not otherwise credited are based on the personnel knowledge and opinions of Lt. Harrison. FOR THE COMMANDING OFFICER
Robert O Harrison 1st Lt. Air Corps Adjutant
1. KEY PERSONNEL Commanding Officer James F. Wood 1st Lt. AC Adjutant Robert O Harrison 1st Lt. AC Operations Officer William G Rusch 2nd Lt. AC Supply Officer James R. Martin F/O Communications Officer Howard L Grim 2nd Lt. AC Engineering Officer Albert H. Townsley W/O jg. 2. STRENGTH a. Redeployment has taken many of our experience and partially experienced personnel, though replacement from the states to this theater has given this organization a few experienced Officers and men as Masters and Crew members. b. The 14th was inactivated on 25 March 1946 by Authority of General Order 40, Headquarters Fifth Air Force, APO 710 dated 12 March 1946. All Officers and Enlisted men were Transferred and assigned to the 3rd Emergency Rescue Squadron, APO 328 which is located at Atsugi, Honshu, Japan. 3. AIRCRAFT ASSIGNED & TYPE (inapplicable) 4. TYPE EQUIPMENT USED 1. 85 Foot Crash Boats 2. 63 Foot Crash Boats 3. Supply Barge. 4. Tug Boat 5. SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS a. Operation activities for this period consisted of training of personnel and repair and maintenance of boats. b. P-626, P-719, and P-356 were taken to Dry Dock for major repairs. on 8 January 46. 6. Summary of Training Progress a. Training activities for the month of March consisted of training runs and on-the-job training for crew members. b. The training mission of the boats were as follows: P-355 and P-362 took a run to Atami on the 4th of March. P-667 went on a training mission to Tateyama. P-362 went to Shimoda on a mission. All boats were practically fully crewed on these missions and gave all the men good experience. The more specific accomplishment of the trips were speed calibrations, fuel consumption test, and navigational practice. For all missions combined a total of 377 hours running was clocked and total mission hours were seventy-four. 7. Specific Problems a. Administration No unusual problems. b. Operations No unusual problems. c. Personnel No unusual problems. d. Supply No unusual problems. e. Engineering No unusual problems. 8. Additional Duties Undertaken by Organization and Connected Problems Not applicable. 9. Information and Recreational Activities and Station Life a. The 14th EBRS during the month of March was located at Yokohama, Honshu, Japan APO 503. b. Athletic equipment is sufficient quantities had furnished the squadron with sufficient recreational life. Four movies are being shown each week. 10. Special Projects Undertaken None 11. Exhibits None




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